What Are You Saying to Your Audience?

what are you telling your audienceYour audience/target market will pay attention to you when you speak directly to them and evoke some sort of an emotional connection. The emotional connection starts when you persuade them to listen long enough for them to develop a brand image which you hope is in the positive. Some may have been pre-exposed to your brand though products themselves via listening stations of online chatter or from friends. While this could be shed in a positive light, it is being provided to them from the brand image that has been developed by the people they are listening to. We know if it is our kids, it is the best thing ever and the must have. If all marketing were only that easy.

Purpose of Your Message

The purpose of your message is to create that emotional connection through a positive brand image to compel them to act. The act is to buy, donate, refer or vote. In communicating your message, you answer what you want them to know and also what you want them to do. This is not always rainbows and unicorns as we saw in the mid-term elections, especially in Nevada, where the negativity that surrounded a high profile campaign turned people off and instead of acting, they retracted. The key is knowing your audience/target market, how they listen to what you want them to know with the understanding that they can accept or not accept and can act or react by not acting at all.

What Do You Want Your Audience to Know?

Identifying what you want them to know is probably most easily answered with that you are their only option/choice as you provide the best offering, best customer service, best customer relations (customers are treated like family) and have the best value. We see with a lot of small businesses where they are trying to tell their audience everything about them by cramming as much copy as possible so that the audience knows every thing that they are offering. This is a whole lot of information to convey when you are trying to connect emotionally. Their brand image will be one of confusion as they were asked to process and accept multiple messages.

You want them to know your one thing. What makes you so much better than the competition? What is the one thing that makes you/your offering so great? What do you do best? I talked about this as it relates to blogging in defining the purpose of your blog as there are thousands upon thousands of blogs and why should yours be chosen? Now there are not thousands upon thousands of same/similar typed products so communicating the one thing, the single message to your audience has to be clearly defined, believable, trustworthy and fit the way your audience speaks and also fit into their lifestyle. If not, the message will bypass them.

What do you want your audience to do?

You want your audience to react positively to your message and take action. Here we see why what you want them to know is so important. How is your message being received, perceived, accepted and acted upon? Are you telling them exactly what you want them to do in your call to action or are they left wondering? We saw how retailers were telling us what they wanted us to do on Black Friday. They told us what time they were opening, they told us what times the door busters would be available – they were telling us to come and shop their store for the items they wanted us to buy. As we see here we do not always have to say BUY from me in a direct way.

What are you saying to your audience? Are you conveying a single message of what you do best?

Like this post? Stay tuned in by subscribing to the blog as tomorrow I will be talking about persuasion through communication.

photo credit: pedrosimoes7

  • It’s not an easy feat to decide what to share with your audience. I don’t think that being totally, 100% transparent is worth the trouble. I read somewhere of an entrepreneur being so transparent with his potential customers to make even his startup’s monthly earnings/expenses public for everyone to see. I’d say that’s a tad too much.
    I strongly believe in being honest and transparent with the public audience, but there are limits. Carefully choosing your overall public “voice” is the hardest of tasks.
    That’s why I chose to be my company’s “social media voice” and not to delegate it to some employee or intern. To me, it’s an important matter, so the least I can do is dedicating all the necessary time and resources to make it effective.

    • Gabriele

      The transparency I do have concerns with. How much is too much? I know that people will say that if you are feeling this way then you may have something to hide. I do not think that is always the case. We have to determine what is best to be put out there as we know it never goes away. I agree that public voice is a hard one. I am a die hard METS and JETS fan and my tweets can be reflective of the score. Is that professional? No but it is me and shows the competitive, strong willed side (think I am justifying those not so business like tweets here). I look at it this way, if someone is not hiring me because I said vomit or he missed it, or dumbass, or telling Thole to hit it to my roof, then were they the right fit for me and the agency? I am not all business all day every day but know when to keep the teams I love off the radar.

      I am very happy that you are the voice as I get to spend some time with you and her all about my heritage in Italy. I am fascinated with the happenings in other countries and how it differs from the US.

  • It’s not an easy feat to decide what to share with your audience. I don’t think that being totally, 100% transparent is worth the trouble. I read somewhere of an entrepreneur being so transparent with his potential customers to make even his startup’s monthly earnings/expenses public for everyone to see. I’d say that’s a tad too much.
    I strongly believe in being honest and transparent with the public audience, but there are limits. Carefully choosing your overall public “voice” is the hardest of tasks.
    That’s why I chose to be my company’s “social media voice” and not to delegate it to some employee or intern. To me, it’s an important matter, so the least I can do is dedicating all the necessary time and resources to make it effective.

  • It’s not an easy feat to decide what to share with your audience. I don’t think that being totally, 100% transparent is worth the trouble. I read somewhere of an entrepreneur being so transparent with his potential customers to make even his startup’s monthly earnings/expenses public for everyone to see. I’d say that’s a tad too much.
    I strongly believe in being honest and transparent with the public audience, but there are limits. Carefully choosing your overall public “voice” is the hardest of tasks.
    That’s why I chose to be my company’s “social media voice” and not to delegate it to some employee or intern. To me, it’s an important matter, so the least I can do is dedicating all the necessary time and resources to make it effective.

  • All good points, Suzanne.

    Every quarter I send an email to my reader and ask them what do they want me to write about.

    It’s a small thing but… I’m always surprised at what readers ‘really’ want to read.

    I use this feedback to change the slant on my articles where appropriate and, of course, email the readers to tell them that I’ve heard what they said and will write those articles and/or create the products they want.

    From a sub-zero Ireland!

    Ivan

    • Ivan

      You are freezing over there! We have finally returned to normal temps here.

      It is amazing when you ask people what they want you to talk about as if we do not are we telling them what they really do want to hear? Many times no. For many businesses, this whole online marketing is difficult as the rankings, new, fresh and relevant content, consistency, etc. They are shooting for the stars trying the next best thing forgetting to see if it ties together with the other marketing efforts.

      On one side of we do not we want them to do we are missing, despite to us it seeming pretty clear, but when we go too far we are pushing the hard sale and people are turned away.

      Oh and please do keep us posted on the deep freeze. I do check as I am a weather geek but hearing it first hand makes it all that much better.

      • …They are shooting for the stars trying the next best thing forgetting to see if it ties together with the other marketing efforts.

        Exactly, It’s a gunshot approach. It does work to a certain extent on TV, for example, but on the web it needs to be a bit more personal.

        Because on the web, you have more choice and are more in control.

        and… beginning to thaw here at last. Snowman starting to slooooooly melt away 🙂

        • Ivan

          Great point about the web where the consumer is more in control. I am not the biggest fan of the word control however when we talk about consumers and their online activity, they have the control to click on or off, the ability to interact or ignore. Different with TV, radio or print. Sure they could ignore the ad, change the channel, turn the page, but at some point they will not do this. How many times during a program will you actually change the channel and risk missing a part of your show? Online, they will automatically click off and move elsewhere as they are not missing anything. Interesting thoughts going through my mind here (you so rock for that!).

          Do you have pics of the snowman? We do not get much snow here in LV and my son, Andrew, is fascinated with seeing pictures of snow and snowmen. A winter wonderland is pretty neat to look at … so long as it does not linger for weeks.

          • We took this in Beijing last xmas. A couple of Snow Angels in there too 🙂

            http://www.flickr.com/photos/ivanwalsh/4139200059/

            My wife has taken the camera with her to an xmas fair – try to take some snaps when she gets back.

          • Ivan

            That is one great snowman! Wow. I was never able to build one so big. Thanks so much for sharing. Andrew is loving it!

  • Pingback: 10 New Tips For Successfully Promoting Your Book On Talk Radio | Fresno Roofing Contractors()